According to the Holy Bible, JANUARY is NOT the first Month of the Year and 01st JANUARY is NOT the First day of the Year.

Today, you must know the Truth and the Truth will make you Free and you must come out of Babylon after discovering this huge Truth (Revelation 18:1-24; Isaiah 51:6-12; Isaiah 13:19-22; Isaiah 21:8-9; ).

What is really the First Month of the Year? To discover the Truth, open your Bible to the Book of:


Nehemiah 2:1 (And it came to pass in the month of Nisan, in the twentieth year of King Artaxerxes, when wine was before him, that I took the wine and gave it to the king. Now I had never been sad in his presence before.)

In the scripture above, we find that it talks of the month of “Nisan” but it does not tell us what exactly the month of Nisan is?! So, to find out more about the month of Nisan, let us consider the scripture below:


Esther 3:7 (In the first month, which is the month of Nisan, in the twelfth year of King Ahasuerus, they cast Pur (that is, the lot), before Haman to determine the day and the month,[a] until it fell on the twelfth month,[b] which is the month of Adar.)

Right, from above we now know that the month of “Nisan” is the First month of the year BUT how is the month of Nisan related to this Generation’s calendar?!

We all know that the bibles we use we translated from Hebrew language and in this case some of the words never got translated such as Nisan, etc

The information below is sourced from this link http://bje.org.au/learning/judaism/calendar/index.html

Also refer for Academy of the Hebrew Language https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_of_the_Hebrew_Language

THE MONTHS OF THE JEWISH YEAR 
Name Number Length Gregorian Equivalent
Nissan 01 30 days March-April
Iyyar 02 29 days April-May
Sivan 03 30 days May-June
Tammuz 04 29 days June-July
Av 05 30 days July-August
Elul 06 29 days August-September
Tishrei 07 30 days September-October
Cheshvan 08 29 or 30 days October-November
Kislev 09 29 or 30 days November-December
Tevet 10 29 days December-January
Sh’vat 11 30 days January-February
Adar 12 29 or 30 days February-March
Adar II (leap year only) 13 29 days March-April

So, from above we see that January is really the 11th month NOT the first month.

But who changed God’s Lunar calendar to solar one?! This will be our next discussion. 

History of the Months and the meanings of their names (http://www.crowl.org/lawrence/time/months.html)

The original Roman year had 10 named months Martius “March”, Aprilis “April”, Maius “May”, Junius “June”, Quintilis “July”, Sextilis “August”, September “September”, October “October”, November “November”, December “December”, and probably two unnamed months in the dead of winter when not much happened in agriculture. The year began with Martius “March”. Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, added the two months Januarius “January” and Februarius “February”. He also moved the beginning of the year from Marius to Januarius and changed the number of days in several months to be odd, a lucky number. After Februarius there was occasionally an additional month of Intercalaris “intercalendar”. This is the origin of the leap-year day being in February. In 46 BC, Julius Caesar reformed the Roman calendar (hence the Julian calendar) changing the number of days in many months and removing Intercalaris.

January — Janus’s month

Middle English Januarie Latin Januarius “of Janus” Latin Janu(s) “Janus” + –arius “ary (pertaining to)” Latin Januarius mensis “month of Janus”

Janus is the Roman god of gates and doorways, depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions. His festival month is January.

Januarius had 29 days, until Julius when it became 31 days long.

February — month of Februa

Middle English Februarius Latin Februarius “of Februa” Latin Februa(s) “Februa” + –arius “ary (pertaining to)” Latin Februarius mensis “month of Februa” Latin dies februatus “day of purification”

Februarius had 28 days, until circa 450 BC when it had 23 or 24 days on some of every second year, until Julius when it had 29 days on every fourth year and 28 days otherwise.

Februa is the Roman festival of purification, held on February fifteenth. It is possibly of Sabine origin.

Intercalaris — inter-calendar month

Latin Intercalaris “inter-calendar” Latin Mercedonius (popular name) “?”

Intercalaris had 27 days until the month was abolished by Julius.

March — Mars’ month

Middle English March(e) Anglo-French March(e) Old English Martius Latin Martius “of Mars” Latin Marti(s) “Mars” + –us (adj. suffix) Latin Martius mensis “month of Mars”

Martius has always had 31 days.

March was the original beginning of the year, and the time for the resumption of war.

Mars is the Roman god of war. He is identified with the Greek god Ares.

April — Aphrodite’s month

Old English April(is) Latin Aprilis Etruscan Apru Greek Aphro, short for Aphrodite.

Aprilis had 30 days, until Numa when it had 29 days, until Julius when it became 30 days long.

Aphrodite is the Greek goddess of love and beauty. She is identified with the Roman goddess Venus.

May — Maia’s month

Old French Mai Old English Maius Latin Maius “of Maia” Latin Maius mensis “month of Maia”

Maius has always had 31 days.

Maia (meaning “the great one”) is the Italic goddess of spring, the daughter of Faunus, and wife of Vulcan.

June — Juno’s month

Middle English jun(e) Old French juin Old English junius Latin Junius “of Juno” Latin Junius mensis “month of Juno”

Junius had 30 days, until Numa when it had 29 days, until Julius when it became 30 days long.

Juno is the principle goddess of the Roman Pantheon. She is the goddess of marriage and the well-being of women. She is the wife and sister of Jupiter. She is identified with the Greek goddess Hera.

July — Julius Caesar’s month

Middle English Julie Latin Julius “Julius” Latin Julius mensis “month of Julius” Latin quintilis mensis “fifth month”

Quintilis (and later Julius) has always had 31 days.

Julius Caesar reformed the Roman calendar (hence the Julian calendar) in 46 BC. In the process, he renamed this month after himself.

August — Augustus Caesar’s month

Latin Augustus “Augustus” Latin Augustus mensis “month of Augustus” Latin sextilis mensis “sixth month”

Sextilis had 30 days, until Numa when it had 29 days, until Julius when it became 31 days long.

Augustus Caesar clarified and completed the calendar reform of Julius Caesar. In the process, he also renamed this month after himself.

September — the seventh month

Middle English septembre Latin September Latin septem “seven” + -ber (adj. suffix) Latin september mensis “seventh month”

September had 30 days, until Numa when it had 29 days, until Julius when it became 30 days long.

October — the eighth month

Middle English octobre Latin October Latin octo “eight” + -ber (adj. suffix) Latin october mensis “eighth month”

October has always had 31 days.

November — the nineth month

Middle English Novembre Latin November Latin Novembris mensis “nineth month”

Novembris had 30 days, until Numa when it had 29 days, until Julius when it became 30 days long.

December — the tenth month

Middle English decembre Old French decembre Latin december “tenth month” Latin decem “ten” + -ber (adj. suffix)

December had 30 days, until Numa when it had 29 days, until Julius when it became 31 days long.

Sources

These sources are somewhat inconsistent. I have chosen interpretations that are predominate among sources or that seem most reasonable.

William Morris, editor, The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, New College Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1976

Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, Portland House, New York, 1989

William Matthew O’Neil, Time and the Calendars, Sydney University Press, 1975

The Almighty God Bless you all

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